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Friday, August 7, 2015

PHOTOS: FIRE-PROOF, FLOOD-PROOF, STORM-PROOF, EARTHQUAKE SAFE MONOLITHIC HOUSE FOR ONLY P290,000?



Image: Foundation — The Monolithic Dome starts as a concrete ring foundation, reinforced with steel rebar. Vertical steel bars embedded in the ring later attached to the steel reinforcing of the dome itself. Small domes may use an integrated floor/ring foundation. Otherwise, the floor is poured after completion of the dome.
The Monolithic Dome starts as a concrete ring foundation.

PHOTOS: FIRE-PROOF, FLOOD-PROOF, STORM-PROOF, EARTHQUAKE SAFE MONOLITHIC HOUSE FOR ONLY P290,000?

Foundation — The Monolithic Dome starts as a concrete ring foundation, reinforced with steel rebar. Vertical steel bars embedded in the ring later attached to the steel reinforcing of the dome itself. Small domes may use an integrated floor/ring foundation. Otherwise, the floor is poured after completion of the dome. (David South Jr)

see video above of the Monolithic Dome tour inside.
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An Airform is placed on the ring base.


Image: Airform  — An Airform – fabricated to the proper shape and size – is placed on the ring base. Using blower fans, it is inflated and the Airform creates the shape of the structure to be completed. The fans run throughout construction of the dome.






Airform — An Airform – fabricated to the proper shape and size – is placed on the ring base. Using blower fans, it is inflated and the Airform creates the shape of the structure to be completed. The fans run throughout construction of the dome. (David South Jr)

Image: Polyurethane Foam — Polyurethane foam is applied to the interior surface of the Airform. Entrance into the air-structure is made through a double door airlock which keeps the air-pressure inside at a constant level. Approximately three inches of foam is applied. The foam is also the base for attaching the steel reinforcing rebar.
Polyurethane foam is applied to the interior surface of the Airform. 

Polyurethane Foam — Polyurethane foam is applied to the interior surface of the Airform. 

Entrance into the air-structure is made through a double door airlock which keeps the air-pressure inside at a constant level. Approximately three inches of foam is applied. The foam is also the base for attaching the steel reinforcing rebar. (David South Jr)
Image: Steel rebar — Steel reinforcing rebar is attached to the foam using a specially engineered layout of hoop (horizontal) and vertical steel rebar. Small domes need small diameter bars with wide spacing. Large domes require larger bars with closer spacing.
 Steel reinforcing rebar is attached to the foam.
Steel rebar — Steel reinforcing rebar is attached to the foam using a specially engineered layout of hoop (horizontal) and vertical steel rebar. Small domes need small diameter bars with wide spacing. Large domes require larger bars with closer spacing. (David South Jr)

Image: Shotcrete — Shotcrete – a special spray mix of concrete – is applied to the interior surface of the dome. The steel rebar is embedded in the concrete and when about three inches of shotcrete is applied, the Monolithic Dome is finished. The blower fans are shut off after the concrete is set.
 Shotcrete – a special spray mix of concrete – is applied to the interior surface of the dome

Shotcrete — Shotcrete – a special spray mix of concrete – is applied to the interior surface of the dome. The steel rebar is embedded in the concrete and when about three inches of shotcrete is applied, the Monolithic Dome is finished. The blower fans are shut off after the concrete is set. (David South Jr)
Source: http://www.monolithic.org/domes

See more images below.

DESIGN SAMPLE 1

Image: Stoned and beautiful – Karen and Dan Tassell’s Monolithic Dome home sits on six acres just outside of Magonolia, Texas.


Image: 800-square-foot, spectacular, small home in Brigham, Utah. No A/C needed. Open windows at night to cool it. It stays cool all day. Owner Lori Hunsaker did the rock cover on the exterior herself.

Image: Enter please! – Karen used her artistic talents in decorating her and Dan’s dome-home.

Image: The right size – The Tassell dome has a diameter of 53 feet, a height of 18 feet, a main living area of 2200 square feet and a loft with 425 square feet.
The right size – The Tassell dome has a diameter of 53 feet, a height of 18 feet, a main living area of 2200 square feet and a loft with 425 square feet. Photo courtesy of Dan Tassel
Image: Gracious living – A generous, open area that includes living room, dining room and kitchen dominates the downstairs.

Image: Going up! – A spiral staircase leads to the loft that circles about two-thirds of the dome’s interior. It has space for two bedrooms and a bath, should the Tassells decide to add.

Image: Comfortable work space – Appliances, cupboards and counters in the kitchen are arranged for efficiency and comfort.

Image: Master bedroom – Furnishing the master bedroom marked the beginning of the moving-in process. Dan said that Karen began just as soon as he hung the first clothes rod in the master bedroom closet.

Image: Master bath – An efficient use of space provides room for storage cabinets.

Image: Anyone for a soak? – This attractive master bath includes a roomy tub. 

Image: The Stoning – Karen and her mom did most of it on their own.

Image: Adhesive – The Tassells used a Dow Corning product that cures in about three days and eventually forms a permanent bond.

Image: Looking natural – The stones are a cultured product manmade out of concrete but look very natural.

Image: What goes where? – The stones came in about four, well coordinated colors and 24 shapes and sizes. Fortunately, Karen and her mom knew just where to put what.

Image: Getting up there! – To stone the very top of the dome, the Tassells used a manlift, loaned to them by Amy and Bob Brooks. 

Image: Wow! – The stoning was completed. Now it’s time to celebrate.

Source: 


Super typhoon-proof dome houses to rise in Dapitan via Rappler

(UPDATE) Monolithic dome houses can withstand typhoons of up to 400 kph and are built at a low cost of P290,000 per unit.


The devastation brought by Yolanda, on the other hand, pushed Scott to introduce monolithic dome houses to officials working for the rehabilitation of Leyte.
“I saw on TV a father who said that he was hugging a coconut tree while his children were holding his legs and arms, but were slowly carried away by the surge. That should not have happened. We could have saved more lives if we were prepared for it,” Scott told Rappler.
Scott said the monolithic dome houses they will build in Dapitan are low-cost at P290,000 ($6,500) per unit and it will last for centuries.
"Whether a typhoon comes, tsunami, earthquake, or fire comes, I promise you these structures will remain,” Scott said.
Read more at Rappler.com
The interior plan of monolithic dome house. Photo courtesy of Michael Scott









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Most of the images used here are from www.monolithic.org





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